The Baby Alex Foundation
Funding Cutting Edge Pediatric Brain Injury Research and Pediatric Brain Injury Patient and Family Support.

Alex's Therapies - Constraint Related


Constraint-induced therapy has been very successful for Alex. The idea behind this therapy is that you cast the able limb, such as a hand or arm, so that it is inoperable, which forces the weak limb to perform.

We have put a cast on Alex's right hand multiple times since he was about 2 years old. Usually, we cast him for two weeks. During this period, his left hand must do the work that his righty was been doing most of the time. After two weeks, we see a significantly improvement in his lefty's strength and abilities. Alex's brain has been building synapses during this constraint period.

When the casting is over, we usually keep the old cast and use it as a removable cast for a few weeks. We put it on when we want to sit down to do some hand therapy, and take it off for the rest of the day. Alex is very resistant to this type of therapy, which makes casting more effective.


Constraint Camps

There are a number of constraint camps offered, usually during the summer, around the country. In Connecticut, the only camp I have observed is The Lefty Righty Camp, held each summer in Waterbury, CT. For information on this camp, contact Cindy Jackson at: 

jackcts01@yahoo.com.


The images on the right are mostly from the Lefty-Righty Camp Alex attended during the summer of 2014. Three weeks of hard work payed off and we have seen huge improvements in his use of lefty. We continue to use his right arm cast at home to work lefty every day.

Tying shoes is very difficult for Alex, but he is learning to use both hands. We have opted not to teach him a single handed shoe tying method, but to continue to work on using both hands. 

In the bottom picture, Alex is putting pegs into a pegboard with his weak hand. This is a tough task, but a very useful one.